How can i control my autistic child?

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Video answer: How to calm down an autistic child - one simple trick to help your child

How to calm down an autistic child - one simple trick to help your child

Top best answers to the question «How can i control my autistic child»

Helping your child with autism thrive tip 1: Provide structure and safety

  1. Be consistent…
  2. Stick to a schedule…
  3. Reward good behavior…
  4. Create a home safety zone…
  5. Look for nonverbal cues…
  6. Figure out the motivation behind the tantrum…
  7. Make time for fun…
  8. Pay attention to your child's sensory sensitivities.
  • If you have an autistic kid, hitting and other aggressive behaviors can often be controlled by some medications. Talk to your doctor about Risperdal , an antipsychotic medicine that has been shown to help tame aggression in autistic children. Other options include various SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and mood stabilizers.
  1. Be consistent…
  2. Stick to a schedule…
  3. Reward good behavior…
  4. Create a home safety zone…
  5. Look for nonverbal cues…
  6. Figure out the motivation behind the tantrum…
  7. Make time for fun…
  8. Pay attention to your child's sensory sensitivities.

Video answer: How to get your autistic child to stop hitting | autism tips by maria borde

How to get your autistic child to stop hitting | autism tips by maria borde

19 other answers

IS OUT OF CONTROL. Children and adults with autism can occasionally have behaviors that are simply beyond your (and their) control. If a child or adult is having a tantrum, the recommended intervention is ignoring the behavior by not looking at, talking to, or touching the person (except for safety). And this will usually help to reduce tantrums over time because the tantrum no longer is receiving attention nor is it getting the person any real benefit.

Now before you come out with pitchforks, I am not about to suggest that you should “spank the autism out of your child” or that you should punish autistic behaviors like stimming or meltdowns.. Because I definitely discipline my autistic son (like I do all my children), but it true discipline isn’t about punishment at all… #1 Disciplining an Autistic Child Starts Before a Negative Behavior

Not all autistic children can use these tools, but many get a lot out of mindfulness and related techniques. Be sure your child gets enough physical exercise. While most typical kids get plenty of time to run around and play (or participate in team sports), children with autism often spend their afterschool time in therapy.

E.g., placing the furniture in the room so as to break up the space and keep the child from running in circles or using everything as a trampoline or jumping off platform ensures that these behaviors stop. Used in conjunction with redirection to a more appropriate area, like outside play equipment, definitely helps.

Keep your calm and don’t involuntarily yell out–when a kid pulls yours or another’s hair all in a sudden. Take a deep breath for that. The List of DON’Ts. Don’t talk (or yell): A child engages in such violent autistic behaviors – even meltdowns – if upset about something. It is often not intentional and those times are not a good time to try reasoning.

Depending on your needs and your child's skill set, you can either do this verbally, use pictures, or write items on a dry erase board. Many children with autism think in pictures, so that is often the initial go to method. It's a simple phrase that provides structure in a child's mind and helps them follow the directions at hand.

Autistic children can get stressed easily, and they need more quiet time than average. It's crucial for them to have time to play or relax all by themselves, and relaxing time with other people is good for them too. For a younger child, an adult should be nearby to keep an eye on them. Older children can be left alone.

Vitamins – Stay away from vitamin A and Zinc, there seems to be too much of it in the autistic child. But there’s commonly a deficiency in Vitamin D, B6, Magnesium, and Calcium. Field Control Therapy – This is a pretty new therapy that we haven’t had experience with.

If the child can’t respond, stay nearby and let the meltdown blow through. When the child seems calmer, try the commands. Encourage Friendships. Autism causes social challenges. Children with autism may seem disinterested in spending time with you, and they may react to your friendly overtures with silence.

Children and adults with autism can occasionally have behaviors that are simply beyond your (and their) control. If a child or adult is having a tantrum, the recommended intervention is ignoring the behavior by not looking at, talking to, or touching the person (except for safety).

Autistic kids often feel more secure when they can predict the day's activities and make sense of the world. Create set places where activities occur. This can help the child stay calm and feel in control of things. Routines also make it easier to narrow down why the child might be acting out.

Visual or non-verbal redirections: Gestures/visuals tell an individual what you want him/her to do without use of words. Hold him/her out, wave to gain his/her attention and then send the message to sit down or stand up with your hands. It is commanding without attending to the behavior.

The next step to discipline an autistic child is to keep things as consistent as possible. Autistic children thrive on routine because they feel confident knowing what to expect. So when you keep life as consistent as possible, your autistic child is much less likely to have negative behaviors caused by anxiety.

If you want, you can show empathy through your body language (such as lying down too if they are lying on the floor crying). Leave them alone if they prefer. Some autistic children may look for a place where they can be alone (like hiding in a closet). If so, let them stay there without interruptions.

Depending on your needs and your child's skill set, you can either do this verbally, use pictures, or write items on a dry erase board. Many children with autism think in pictures, so that is often the initial go to method. It's a simple phrase that provides structure in a child's mind and helps them follow the directions at hand.

Make sure your child spends some time with both autistic and non-autistic children. Interacting with non-autistic children helps your child develop more attentive and responsive behaviors. Fellow autistic children teach your child that there is nothing wrong with them, and that there are other people just like them.

Vitamins – Stay away from vitamin A and Zinc, there seems to be too much of it in the autistic child. But there’s commonly a deficiency in Vitamin D, B6, Magnesium, and Calcium. Field Control Therapy – This is a pretty new therapy that we haven’t had experience with.

Whenever you pace, fiddle with your hair, bite your pencil, or squeeze your hands, you're stimming. Stimming is both more necessary and more noticeable in autistic children, due to sensory issues. 2 Protect the child from negativity.

Just as you surround a child with autism with acceptance, do the same for parents. Your support could mean the world to them. Advocates explain that parents would love a night off to decompress and get away. If you feel comfortable with the idea, offer to babysit.

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Video answer: Autistic child's abusive behavior | autism meltdown

Autistic child's abusive behavior | autism meltdown